Blog, Human Resources

Older generations have always been critical of the younger ones. From Socrates referring to youths as “bad-mannered tyrants with a lack of respect for their elders” to current young people being blamed for killing countless industries – the toxicity is real.

The current generation receiving the criticism flack is the “millennial,” currently between 21 and 37 years of age. The accusation that they’re the reason for the collapse of several businesses isn’t unfounded. They just can’t afford diamonds, houses, and sometimes even cereal. This comes as no surprise, as millennials carry an average debt of $42,000. As these debts soar and inflation continues to rise, it’s likely the deaths of once-booming industries won’t end any time soon. On the surface it appears as though millennials are doomed to fail, but is it all bad?

The average Canadian lifespan, as of 2011, is nearly 82 years. Compared to the 57-year average in 1921, Canadians are living approximately 25 years longer than previous generations. It was once believed that as people aged, they became more politically conservative. The millennial generation proves that it isn’t age that makes one conservative, but wealth – and millennials don’t have much of that. There’s a reason why money isn’t everything for the younger generation; they prioritize work that’s ethical and makes a social impact over a big paycheque, are more politically engaged, and more educated than any preceding generation (thus the heavy student-loan debt). Despite what some baby boomers might tell you, millennials are hard-working and motivated, making them an asset in the workplace.

Passion is what drives millennial ambitions. Previously, working hard at a job you hated wasn’t frowned upon. Now, you can work just as hard at a job you hate, just like your parents and their parents before them, and still struggle to make ends meet. Suddenly, working as a teacher might be just as risky as pursuing dreams of being an actor or painter.

But the ideal life is no longer built around a picket fence and a 9-to-5 job with benefits. In fact, millennials are dominating their side hustles, and putting their passions into overdrive on top of their regular work week. In the U.S., more than half of millennials are starting apps, freelancing their talents, or trying their hands at things like YouTube channels.

With all of this time and energy going towards work and passion projects, more and more members of this generation are waiting longer to have children, which also has its benefits. Having children later in life has proven to make you a more patient parent, and also makes you more likely to raise emotionally healthy adults. And, with people living into their eighties, waiting to have children doesn’t mean sacrificing time you get to spend with them.

All in all, millennials take a lot of criticism from previous generations, but obtaining multiple degrees and working longer hours doesn’t leave much time to dwell on those judgements. And eventually, we’ll turn our attention towards the entitled kids of the next generation.

 

Jasmine Cormier

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Blog, Human Resources

Good workplace rules keep employees safe and the business running smoothly. Enforcing those rules is important both for employers and employees. Employees need to know, understand, and comply with company rules. It’s the employer’s responsibility to make sure all regulations are followed consistently. Every employee should be aware of the repercussions for breaching the rules. It could result in disciplinary measures like warnings, suspension, or termination. The following factors should be considered when implementing and enforcing workplace rules and regulations: keep reading

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Blog, Human Resources

Job seekers tend to do a lot of research into what employers want from them, but few put as much time into thinking about what they should expect from their employers. Below is a list of mandates that any good employer should follow to function well as an organization and maintain the loyalty of their workers.

Ensure Their Health and Safety

Many seem to assume that this point is only relevant to companies asking their employees to perform physical tasks, but this can easily apply to a typical office setting as well. Saddling your employees with unrealistic goals or huge workloads can take a heavy toll on their mental and physical health when the long hours they spend trying to meet unreasonable targets start to add up. Make sure that both their physical and mental wellbeing are taken into account when developing work policies and assigning tasks. Otherwise a burnt-out, less effective staff and high employee turnover are likely in your company’s future.

Create Opportunities for Employees to Grow

Without room to fully utilize their individual skillsets and advance within the organization, employees will inevitably become bored or dissatisfied. Employers should take the time to provide workers with chances to expand their knowledge and entrust them with new responsibilities and opportunities. In doing so, the company will be rewarded with higher rates of worker retention, job satisfaction, and a healthier, more vibrant office culture as a whole.

Build Trust into Hiring and Work Practices  

If you focus on hiring people you trust to work independently, you’ll avoid falling into the trap of micromanaging your staff. When workers are polled about company engagement, trust is consistently one of the most desired traits that workers look for from management. Strong hiring practices will ensure that your company only hires people that fall into that coveted “trusted” category, which will in turn cultivate better relationships between employees and management.

At the end of the day, companies have a responsibility to make themselves appealing to people seeking employment. Just as the average job seeker will spend a great deal of time perfecting their resume and interview skills, companies should work on improving their work culture and streamlining their processes to not only be more efficient, but also more people-friendly as well.

 

– Lance Wang

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Blog, Human Resources

When done right, succession planning is the seamless process of replacing a top executive when they decide to leave an organization. However, as business trends change, so does the system. The practice is now more inclusive and has a wider scope. Aside from exit strategies, succession planning should take into account both the short-term and long-term stability and sustainability of a company’s human resources, as well as the individual development of its employees. keep reading

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Blog, Human Resources

There’s a lot of competition in the workforce, not just in terms of finding a job, but also when it comes to securing a promotion or raise. Being a good worker isn’t enough; most employees in a company are good. Great employees possess some special characteristics that differentiate them from the rest. They do things differently and take advantage of opportunities presented to them.
keep reading

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Blog, Human Resources

A simple contract is an agreement made by two parties. This agreement can be an oral or a written one. There must be an offer, consideration, and an acceptance to make it valid. Even if the document is not drafted by a lawyer, it can still land you in court in the case of a breach of the contract. It’s advisable to have a written contract rather than a verbal one. keep reading

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Blog, Human Resources

Hiring can be a difficult process. You need a position filled quickly but you’re not sure where to look, or you don’t have time to conduct a search with all the other things you have to do. There are lots of companies dedicated to helping businesses address this issue but weeding out the good ones from the bad can be almost as confusing as actually hiring a new employee. keep reading

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Blog, Human Resources

Human resources is one of the most important departments of a business, handling everything from hiring, training, and employee satisfaction to safety and remuneration practices. In executing these duties, the HR team is expected to balance the needs and goals of the company against the needs and rights of employees.

A few small adjustments can improve the efficiency of your HR department and, ultimately, of your entire organization. Here are some tips to help in key areas.


Recruitment

Use web-based tools. Go to where today’s job-seekers are: on social media, in particular LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. Post job openings on your company’s social media, where shares will help give you the widest net possible. Also crucial are online job-search engines like Indeed and Monster, which are among the go-to destinations for people looking for jobs. Finally, make sure your company website features up-to-date postings about the latest job openings, as candidates will likely find your site while researching your industry.

Tap your existing networks. Employees already know the organization, so they’ll have a good understanding of what sorts of people will likely be a good fit at the company. In addition to existing staff, your own business contacts and others in your personal network may also suggest strong candidates. You never know where that next great hire will come from.

Participate in career fairs. Job fairs, such as those aimed at college and university graduates, provide opportunities to meet face-to-face with large numbers of skilled and interested candidates who are actively seeking work. It’s also an excellent opportunity to increase the visibility of your organization.


Performance Management

Monitor job performance regularly. The sooner difficulties are identified, the sooner they can be addressed for the benefit of everyone, employees and employer alike. Don’t wait until scheduled evaluations like annual reviews to commend employees or point out and address deficiencies and shortcomings.

Recognize and reward stars. By consistently rewarding strong performance within your organization, you’ll encourage your whole staff to continue to work hard and strive for excellence, which will not only help productivity and the overall quality of work, but also boost employee retention.


Communications

Invite feedback. Let employees know that HR is willing to listen and respond. Create easy and safe ways for people to voice their ideas, suggestions, comments, and concerns. An open-door policy for HR, as well as online surveys and a suggestion box (both physical and virtual) are just some of the tools you can use to encourage the staff to give their opinions.


Technology

Embrace the future. Use technology for virtually every aspect of the HR department’s responsibilities; if you haven’t already made the switch, do it now. Software is available to streamline HR administration, improve record-keeping, help manage talent, enable secure access to documents, and a number of other functions. It may seem like a major disruption at the outset but integrating the latest technology can save your department and the organization at large time, money, and effort in the end.

 

– M. Wronzberg

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